Search by State

Top Allied Health OTA By State

Looking for Occupational Therapy Assistant near you in Clifton, NJ


Find Programs Near You

OTA

What is an Occupational Therapy Assistant?

An Occupational Therapy Assistant (or OTA) assists patients in their recovery by providing therapy, education and support activities. An OTA works directly under the supervision of an Occupational Therapist. They will monitor and keep record of a patient’s progress and help educate their patient’s family/caretakers of their treatment program. Overall employment of occupational therapy assistants and aides is projected to grow 31% from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all occupations (from bls.gov).

What does an OTA do?

  • Help patients with their exercises and stretches
  • Teach patients to use special equipment
  • Lead children who have developmental disabilities in activities that promote lifestyle adaptations
  • Transport patients; clerical and cleaning duties

The Pros & Cons

    Pros:

  • Impactful & rewarding career
  • Flexible Schedule
  • Less stressful than some other jobs in allied health

    Cons:

  • Weekend & evening hours may be required
  • Licensing varies state to state
  • Requires hours of standing on your feet, constant kneeling/stooping and physically demanding tasks such as lifting patients

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for Occupational Therapy Assistants and Aides is rapidly growing.

Quick Facts: Occupational Therapy Assistants and Aides

2018 Median Pay

$57,620 per year
$27.70 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

51,700

Job Outlook, 2018-28

31% (Much faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

16,000

*Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/occupational-therapy-assistants-and-aides.htm

How do I become an OTA?

To become an OTA, generally you need to complete two full-time years at an accredited school. In addition, students must complete at least 16 weeks of hands-on work in the field. Upon graduation, an Associate’s Degree would be awarded. Certifications in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and basic life support (BLS) are also required before entering the workforce. If you are looking for a career where you can be creative, work in a variety of setting and help improve your patients’ quality of life, then being an occupational therapy assistant is a great choice! Look for a school in your area that offers this program by clicking here.

EMT and Paramedic

What is the difference between an EMT and Paramedic?

An EMT (Emergency Medical Technician) is more of an entry-level job yet they still learn all of the necessary skills in life-saving scenarios. A paramedic has a more advanced education in emergency care and they usually have a specialization such as cardiology or medications. The median annual wage for EMTs and paramedics was $34,320 in May 2018 (from bls.gov).

What does an EMT and/or Paramedic do?

  • Responds to emergency 911 calls
  • Performs emergency medical services such as CPR
  • Transports patients to medical facilities
  • Performs and interprets medical tests

The Pros & Cons

    Pros:
  • Help to save people’s lives
  • Job stability is good; there will never be a time when emergency services are not needed
  • Every day can bring new challenges and experiences
  • A great foundation if you’re looking to become a nurse or doctor
    Cons:
  • Long shifts, weekends and nights
  • Dealing with unpleasant patients
  • Physically demanding
  • Paperwork load can be excessive

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for EMTs and Paramedics is growing.

Quick Facts: EMTs and Paramedics

2018 Median Pay

$34,320 per year
$16.50 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

262,100

Job Outlook, 2018-28

7% (Faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

18,700

Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/emts-and-paramedics.htm

How to become an EMT and/or Paramedic

EMT basic training can take anywhere between 6 months and 2 years (depending on the institution). After the student has earned their diploma or certificate, they will be asked to test for either a state or national licensing exam and they will also be required to pass a background check. Some students may choose to stay in school closer to the 2-year mark in order to receive their paramedic Associate’s degree, which is more advanced and comprehensive.

If you are looking for a career in the healthcare industry that is exciting, has great advancement opportunities and where you are not stuck in a cubicle for 8 hours a day, an EMT/Paramedic is a hot choice for you!

Diagnostic Medical Sonographer

What is a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer?

Diagnostic medical sonographers create images of internal body tissues to aid doctors in making medical diagnoses such as pregnancy, cancer and heart disease. A medical sonographer will obtain and review patient history in order to create the optimum ultrasound tests. Expect to work in a hospital, doctor’s office or other medical facility.

What does a Diagnostic Medical Sonographer do?

  • Operate special imaging equipment to create images
  • Perform examinations
  • Record patient anatomic condition
  • Provide diagnostic information to supervising physicians

The Pros & Cons

    Pros:
  • Work hands on with expensive cutting-edge equipment and technology
  • Job variety; you never know what you may see inside of someone!
  • You can choose a specialty in your field that most interests you such as fetal echocardiography
    Cons:
  • Physically demanding; standing on your feet all day
  • You may be called in to work after-hours in emergency situations
  • Weekend and/or evening hours may be required

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for Diagnostic Medical Sonographers is growing.

Quick Facts: Diagnostic Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians, Including Vascular Technologists

2018 Median Pay

$67,080 per year
$32.25 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

130,700

Job Outlook, 2018-28

14% (Much faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

18,000

Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/diagnostic-medical-sonographers.htm

How do you become a Sonographer?

You may complete a 1-year (Certificate), 2-year (Associate’s) or 4-year (Bachelor’s) degree. Clinical on-site experience is also required which may be up to 12 months. Make sure the program you choose is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).

If you are detail oriented, enjoy working with people, are a great communicator and enjoy a challenge, then becoming a diagnostic medical sonographer may be the best choice for you! Find accredited schools in your area now!

Medical Billing & Coding

What is Medical Billing & Coding?

Physicians love their medical billers and coders. Why? Because they are the people that make sure they get compensated for their services! Medical billers & coders will read patient charts (medical history, diagnoses, prescribed medications, etc.) to then transcribe them into a code that is used by both healthcare providers and insurance companies. As the demand for health services increases, job growth is expected to grow by an above average 11% between 2018-2018 (from bls.gov).

What does a Medical Biller & Coder do?

  • Process health insurance claims
  • Transcribe medical records through a special code system
  • Track payments
  • Work in either a hospital, clinic, doctor’s office, health insurance company or through a 3rd party administrator

The Pros & Cons

    Pros:
  • Employment is steady; at a record level of 11% in growth between 2018 and 2018, based on BLS statistics
  • Work from home
  • opportunities are available
  • Great career advancement potential
    Cons:
  • The actual coding is very complex and challenging
  • Workload may be overloaded; there are a ton of insurance claims!
  • Continuing education is required yearly

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for Medical Billers & Coders is growing faster than the average.

Quick Facts: Medical Records and Health Information Technicians

2018 Median Pay

$40,350 per year
$19.40 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

215,500

Job Outlook, 2018-28

11% (Much faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

23,100

Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-records-and-health-information-technicians.htm

Medical Billing & Coding School Options

One of the benefits of starting a career in MBC is your schooling options. You should decide what option is best for you, depending on how quickly you want to enter the workforce and how much you want to earn. You can earn your Certificate or Diploma in as little as 9 to 12 months. In two years, you can earn your Associate’s Degree and in 4 years, your Bachelor’s Degree in a more advanced program such as Health Information Management. Whatever path you choose, make sure your school is accredited by the American Academy of Professional Coders (AAPC) or the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA).

The people best suited for medical billing and coding enjoy working independently, the ability to work from home with their own hours and being their own boss. If this sounds like you, check out local schools that offer this program today!

Surgical Technology

What is Surgical Technology?

A surgical technologist has a majorly important job in the operating room. They support the entire medical team of nurses and doctors before, during and after surgery. During a procedure, a surgical technologist will assist with equipment, instruments and supplies. Think of your favorite medical T.V. show when the doctor is performing a major life saving surgery, opens up his hand and says “Forceps” and that person hands him the forceps…that is the surgical technologist and that could be you!

What does a Surgical Technologist Do?

  • Prepare operating rooms
  • Sterilize & supply surgical equipment and tools
  • Prep patients for surgery
  • Assists in post-operative duties such as cleaning the OR

The Pros & Cons

    Pros:
  • Rewarding and exciting work environment. You will be a part of a team that is saving lives!
  • Opportunities to be a traveling surgical technician (for those who prefer a nomad lifestyle).
  • Job Stability; advancements in medical technology means more operations are being done to treat a variety of illnesses and diseases.
    Cons:
  • Risk of infection since you are handling sharp surgical tools
  • Physically demanding; standing for long periods of time
  • Blood and guts…it’s surgery…not a good choice for you if you tend to get squeamish

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for surgical technologists is growing faster then average.

Quick Facts: Surgical Technologists

2018 Median Pay

$47,300 per year
$22.74 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

112,100

Job Outlook, 2018-28

9% (Faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

9,700

Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/surgical-technologists.htm

How to become a Surgical Technologist

One of the benefits of starting a career as a Surgical Technologist is your schooling options. You should decide what option is best for you, depending on how quickly you want to enter the workforce and how much you want to earn. You can earn your Certificate or Diploma in as little as 9 to 15 months. In two years, you can earn your Associate’s Degree. Whatever degree you choose, make sure your school and program are accredited by either the CAAHEP or the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES). This will ensure that you are eligible to take the Certified Surgical Technologist (CST) exam, which is required by some states and usually a requirement from employers in the field.

There are a ton of benefits to being a surgical technologist such as upward career mobility, easier job transfer options, flexible scheduling, wearing comfortable scrubs to work every day and many more! Start your path to this amazing career and find a school in your area today!

Find Programs Near You
Featured Allied Health Schools
Back to Top