FIND ALLIED HEALTH SCHOOLS

Search by State

Top Allied Health Programs By State

Allied health programs are as diverse as they are popular. They may range from highly-skilled occupations like nursing, veterinary science, pharmacy technician and phlebotomists. Also, for every method of treatment or every type of medical equipment, it is likely that there exists a specialized allied healthcare occupation associated with the specialization. According to recent estimates, there are about 200 allied health careers today, consisting of dozens of therapist, medical technologist, and medical technician jobs, all with educational training, certification, and expertise requirements. Healthcare professions are generally well paid. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), healthcare practitioners in the US earned a median annual wage of $60,200 – $30,870 as of May 2012. With the ever-increasing US population and the continuing growth of the healthcare industry, the demand for new allied healthcare workers in the coming years should be on the rise. This in turn should mean plenty of employment opportunities especially for those soon-to-be graduates of allied health educational programs.

Find Programs Near You

Dental Assistant

What is a Dental Assistant?

Dental Assistants are valuable members of the dental care team. Dental Assistants support dentists in different functions providing efficient dental treatment for patients. Dental Assistants enjoy working with their hands, have strong communication skills and want a job with responsibility.

What does a Dental Assistant do?

  • Assist Dentist with treatment procedures.
  • Dental x-rays.
  • Ask patient about medical history, help patients feel comfortable.
  • Teach patients oral hygiene care.
 

The Pros & Cons

Pros:

  • Potential for career growth. For example, you can continue your education after 2 to 3 years of experience to become a dental hygienist and boost your income substantially.
  • The variety, challenge, and reward for taking responsibility for many tasks
  • Flexibility to work full time or part time and work in environments that are typically very pleasant

Cons:

  • Because you are working with your hands and many tools, there is a higher chance of personal injury
  • May be prone to backaches, headaches, and numbness in your wrists.
  • Dealing with a lot of bodily fluids, so if you don’t have a strong stomach this maybe isn’t a job for you!
 

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for Dental Assistants is quickly growing.

Quick Facts: Dental Assistants

2018 Median Pay

$38,660 per year
$18.59 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

346,000

Job Outlook, 2018-28

11% (Much faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

38,700

*Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/dental-assistants.htm

How do you become a Dental Assistant?

The Dental Assistant program takes on average one to two years to complete. Students earn a dental assisting certificate or an Associate degree in Dental Assisting. Students pursuing a dental assistant degree will typically receive some training in dental science and dental office skills.

A lot of dental assistants love their job because they enjoy the continuing education and new skills they acquire as technology advances, the variety of their daily duties and the chance to connect with their patients as they help them improve their smile. Embark on your journey to becoming a dental assistant today here at AmeriColleges.com!

Medical Assistant

What is a Medical Assistant?

Medical assistants perform administrative and clinical tasks to support the work of physicians and most healthcare professionals. Their responsibilities may differ depending on the type or specialty of the healthcare office they’re working in. Medical assistants are not to be confused with physician assistants, who are licensed and trained to do medical procedures with supervision from a physician.

What does a Medical Assistant do?

  • Assist Dentist with treatment procedures.
  • Perform nursing procedures under supervision of physician or physician assistant.
  • Assist the physician in exam rooms, interview patients, measure vital signs, and document in patient’s chart.
  • Make sure all information and reports are in the patient’s medical records before they arrive for their appointment.
  • Prepare sterilization of medical instruments and supplies.
 

The Pros & Cons

Pros:
  • The opportunity to specialize in different areas and in a wide variety of settings
  • More time to do assessment techniques than direct patient care
  • Flexibility is scheduling. Since MA’s are needed 24 hours a day, you can have a say in what shifts work best around your lifestyle and family
Cons:
  • Overtime hours may be required
  • Dealing with demanding patients and their families can be stressful
  • Many responsibilities mean your work day may be overwhelming and tiring

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for Medical Assistants is rapidly growing.

Quick Facts: Medical Assistants

2018 Median Pay

$33,610 per year
$16.16 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

686,600

Job Outlook, 2018-28

23% (Much faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

154,900

*Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/medical-assistants.htm

How to become a Medical Assistant

Medical Assistants receive a Certificate or Diploma after one completed year and/or an Associate’s Degree, which takes two years to complete. Some of the core classes are anatomy, medical terminology, phlebotomy and physiology. The majority of employers will require the AAMA (American Association of Medical Assistants) certification which will be awarded to you after you pass the exam. Competition in this field is fierce so obtaining you AAMA certification will bump your resume up to the top of the list!

Pharmacy Technician

What is a Pharmacy Technician?

Pharmacy technicians, or pharmaceutical technicians, work closely with licensed pharmacists in the proper dispensing of prescription medicine. These healthcare professionals are routinely found in hospitals and retail pharmacies or drugstores.

What does a Pharmacy Technician do?

  • Coordinating with other healthcare professionals and customers in filling a prescription.
  • Making sure the correct amount and form of prescription medicine is dispensed.
  • Proper labeling and packaging of prescriptions.
  • Mixing medications, especially when preparing ointments.
  • Facilitating payment for prescriptions and processing insurance claims.
  • Handling pharmaceutical-related inquiries from customers.

In some cases, hospital-based pharmacy technicians may directly assist in preparing special medications like intravenous medications, and as needed, may do rounds in the hospital to ensure that the right medication is given to patients and to check if the dosage is accurate. The most critical characteristic of a pharmacy technician is the absolute need for accuracy and precision to ensure patient health and safety.

 

The Pros & Cons of Being a Pharmacy Technician

Pros:
  • Flexible work schedules
  • Pleasant work environments
  • Job growth in this industry is projected to increase by 7% by 2028.
Cons:
  • Stress can be a major con since you have to be incredibly accurate when dealing with medication.
  • The work can also be very repetitive since you are filling prescriptions all day, every day.
  • Night, weekend and holiday hours may be required.
 

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for Pharmacy Technicians is on the rise.

Quick Facts: Medical Assistants

2018 Median Pay

$32,700 per year
$15.72 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

420,400

Job Outlook, 2018-28

7% (Faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

31,500

*Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/pharmacy-technicians.htm

 

How to become a Pharmacy Technician

One of the perks of starting a career as a pharmacy technician is your schooling options. You should decide what option is best for you, depending on how quickly you want to enter the workforce and how much you want to earn. You can earn your Certificate or Diploma in as little as 6 months or up to a year. If you seek an Associate’s Degree, expect to be in school for at least two years.
Whatever option you choose, make sure your school covers the topics that are on the following two exams:

  • Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam (PTCE) offered by the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB)
  • Exam for the Certification of Pharmacy Technicians (ExCPT) offered by the National Healthcareer Association (NHA)
 

Most employers will expect both of these certifications to qualify.

Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

What is a Veterinary Technology?

Veterinary technologists and technicians perform medical tests on animals to diagnose injuries and/or illnesses, under the supervision of a veterinarian. They are basically the veterinarian’s assistant and do everything they can so the doctor can focus on treatment of the sick animal.

What does a Vet Tech do?

  • Assists during surgery
  • Gives medications
  • Clean and wrap wounds; clean animal teeth
  • Check vital statistics such as heart rate and temperature
  • Clerical work
 

Pros & Cons of being a Vet Tech

Pros:
  • Working hands-on with all kinds of animals on a daily basis
  • You get to wear pajamas to work (technically, they are called scrubs…)
  • Employment growth, between 2018 and 2028, is projected to increase by an above average 19% (from bls.gov).
Cons:
  • You also have to work with pet owners who may not always be so nice
  • Blood, poop, pee and vomit may involuntarily become a part of your wardrobe every day
  • Risk of injury from aggressive animals
 

Occupational Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the need for Veterinary Technologists/Technicians is quickly growing.

Quick Facts: Veterinary Technologists and Technicians

2018 Median Pay

$34,420 per year
$16.55 per hour

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

None

Number of Jobs, 2018

109,400

Job Outlook, 2018-28

19% (Much faster than average)

Employment Change, 2018-28

21,100

*Reference: https://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/veterinary-technologists-and-technicians.htm

How do I become a Veterinary Technologist or Technician?

The first step is earning your Associate’s degree in Veterinary Technology, which will take two years.  Upon completion of your degree, students must pass the National Exam (administered by the American Association of Veterinary State Boards).   Veterinary Techs are also encouraged to join the National Association of Veterinary Technicians in America.  The next step in advancing your career in this field is to complete your Bachelor’s degree as a Veterinary Technologist.

Being a veterinary tech is not all puppy hugs and bunny kisses but it is a very important job. Sometimes our beloved pets get sick or injured and need our help. If you truly have a passion for helping animals and don’t mind getting your hands dirty, then consider a job as a veterinary technician!

Find Programs Near You
Featured Allied Health Schools
Back to Top